Naturalism in American Literature

Definitions The term naturalism describes a type of literature that attempts to apply scientific principles of objectivity and detachment to its study of human beings. Unlike realism, which focuses on literary technique, naturalism implies a philosophical position: for naturalistic writers, since human beings are, in Emile Zola’s phrase, “human beasts,” characters can be studied through their relationships to their surroundings. Zola’s 1880 description of this method in Le roman experimental (The Experimental Novel, 1880) follows Claude Bernard’s medical model and the historian Hippolyte Taine’s observation that “virtue and vice are products like vitriol and sugar”–that is, that human beings as “products” should be studied impartially, without moralizing about their natures. Other influences on American naturalists include Herbert Spencer and Joseph LeConte.

Through this objective study of human beings, naturalistic writers believed that the laws behind the forces that govern human lives might be studied and understood. Naturalistic writers thus used a version of the scientific method to write their novels; they studied human beings governed by their instincts and passions as well as the ways in which the characters’ lives were governed by forces of heredity and environment. Although they used the techniques of accumulating detail pioneered by the realists, the naturalists thus had a specific object in mind when they chose the segment of reality that they wished to convey.

In George Becker’s famous and much-annotated and contested phrase, naturalism’s philosophical framework can be simply described as “pessimistic materialistic determinism.” Another such concise definition appears in the introduction to American Realism: New Essays. In that piece,”The Country of the Blue,”Eric Sundquist comments, “Revelling in the extraordinary, the excessive, and the grotesque in order to reveal the immutable bestiality of Man in Nature, naturalism dramatizes the loss of individuality at a physiological level by making a Calvinism without God its determining order and violent death its utopia” (13).

A modified definition appears in Donald Pizer’s Realism and Naturalism in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction, Revised Edition (1984):

[T]he naturalistic novel usually contains two tensions or contradictions, and . . . the two in conjunction comprise both an interpretation of experience and a particular aesthetic recreation of experience. In other words, the two constitute the theme and form of the naturalistic novel. The first tension is that between the subject matter of the naturalistic novel and the concept of man which emerges from this subject matter. The naturalist populates his novel primarily from the lower middle class or the lower class. . . . His fictional world is that of the commonplace and unheroic in which life would seem to be chiefly the dull round of daily existence, as we ourselves usually conceive of our lives. But the naturalist discovers in this world those qualities of man usually associated with the heroic or adventurous, such as acts of violence and passion which involve sexual adventure or bodily strength and which culminate in desperate moments and violent death. A naturalistic novel is thus an extension of realism only in the sense that both modes often deal with the local and contemporary. The naturalist, however, discovers in this material the extraordinary and excessive in human nature.

The second tension involves the theme of the naturalistic novel. The naturalist often describes his characters as though they are conditioned and controlled by environment, heredity, instinct, or chance. But he also suggests a compensating humanistic value in his characters or their fates which affirms the significance of the individual and of his life. The tension here is that between the naturalist’s desire to represent in fiction the new, discomfiting truths which he has found in the ideas and life of his late nineteenth-century world, and also his desire to find some meaning in experience which reasserts the validity of the human enterprise. (10-11)

For further definitions, see also The Cambridge Guide to American Realism and Naturalism, Charles Child Walcutt’s American Literary Naturalism: A Divided Stream, June Howard’s Form and History in American Literary Naturalism, Walter Benn Michaels’s The Gold Standard and the Logic of Naturalism, Lee Clark Mitchell’s Determined Fictions, Mark Selzer’s Bodies and Machines, and other works from the naturalism bibliography. See Lars Ahnebrink, Richard Lehan, and Louis J. Budd for information on the intellectual European and American backgrounds of naturalism.

haracteristics Characters. Frequently but not invariably ill-educated or lower-class characters whose lives are governed by the forces of heredity, instinct, and passion. Their attempts at exercising free will or choice are hamstrung by forces beyond their control; social Darwinism and other theories help to explain their fates to the reader. See June Howard’s Form and History for information on the spectator in naturalism.

Setting. Frequently an urban setting, as in Norris’s McTeague. See Lee Clark Mitchell’s Determined Fictions, Philip Fisher’s Hard Facts, and James R. Giles’s The Naturalistic Inner-City Novel in America.

Techniques and plots. Walcutt says that the naturalistic novel offers “clinical, panoramic, slice-of-life” drama that is often a “chronicle of despair” (21). The novel of degeneration–Zola’s L’Assommoir and Norris’s Vandover and the Brute, for example–is also a common type.

Themes 1.Walcutt identifies survival, determinism, violence, and taboo as key themes.

2. The “brute within” each individual, composed of strong and often warring emotions: passions, such as lust, greed, or the desire for dominance or pleasure; and the fight for survival in an amoral, indifferent universe. The conflict in naturalistic novels is often “man against nature” or “man against himself” as characters struggle to retain a “veneer of civilization” despite external pressures that threaten to release the “brute within.”

3. Nature as an indifferent force acting on the lives of human beings. The romantic vision of Wordsworth–that “nature never did betray the heart that loved her”–here becomes Stephen Crane’s view in “The Open Boat”: “This tower was a giant, standing with its back to the plight of the ants. It represented in a degree, to the correspondent, the serenity of nature amid the struggles of the individual–nature in the wind, and nature in the vision of men. She did not seem cruel to him then, nor beneficent, nor treacherous, nor wise. But she was indifferent, flatly indifferent.”

4. The forces of heredity and environment as they affect–and afflict–individual lives.

5. An indifferent, deterministic universe. Naturalistic texts often describe the futile attempts of human beings to exercise free will, often ironically presented, in this universe that reveals free will as an illusion.

Practitioners Frank Norris
Theodore Dreiser
Jack London
Stephen Crane
Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth (1905)
Ellen Glasgow,Barren Ground (1925) (

John Dos Passos (1896-1970), U.S.A. trilogy (1938): The 42nd Parallel (1930), 1919 (1932), andThe Big Money (1936)
James T. Farrell (1904-1979), Studs Lonigan (1934)
John Steinbeck (1902-1968), The Grapes of Wrath (1939)
Richard Wright, Native Son (1940), Black Boy (1945)
Norman Mailer (1923-2007), The Naked and the Dead (1948)
William Styron, Lie Down in Darkness (1951)
Saul Bellow, The Adventures of Augie March (1953)

Other writers sometimes identified as naturalists:

Nelson Algren, The Man with the Golden Arm
Sherwood Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio (1919)
Harriet Arnow, The Dollmaker (1954)
Ambrose Bierce
Abraham Cahan, The Making of an American Citizen
Kate Chopin, The Awakening
Rebecca Harding Davis
Don DeLillo
Paul Laurence Dunbar, The Sport of the Gods
Edward Eggleston, The Hoosier School-Master
William Faulkner
Harold Frederic, The Damnation of Theron Ware (1896)
Henry Blake Fuller, The Cliff-Dwellers
Hamlin Garland, Rose of Dutcher’s Coolly
Robert Herrick, The Memoirs of an American Citizen (1905)
Ernest Hemingway
E. W. Howe, The Story of a Country Town
Joseph Kirkland,
Joyce Carol Oates
David Graham Phillips
Hubert Selby, Jr.
Upton Sinclair, The Jungle

Stephen Crane
on Nature
and the
Universe
When it occurs to a man that nature does not regard him as important, and that she feels she would not maim the universe by disposing of him, he at first wishes to throw bricks at the temple, and he hates deeply the fact that there are no bricks and no temples.
Stephen Crane, “The Open Boat” 

A man said to the universe:
“Sir, I exist!”
“However,” replied the universe,
“The fact has not created in me
A sense of obligation.” –Stephen Crane (1894, 1899)

http://public.wsu.edu.

Article – Naturalismo

“Entrusting Ourselves to the One Who Judges Justly”

by Darrin W. Snyder Belousek

American Literary Naturalism

English 519, Roggenkamp

 

I.             Naturalism Defined

 

a.       “A term used by (French novelist Emile Zola) to describe the application of the clinical method of empirical science to all of life. . . . If a writer wishes to depict life as it really is, he or she must be rigorously deterministic in the representation of the characters’ thoughts and actions in order to show forth the causal factors that have made the characters inevitably what they are. . . . Unlike realism, which also seeks to represent human life as it is actually lived, naturalism specifically connects itself to the philosophical doctrine of biological and social determinism, according to which human beings are devoid of free will” (Greig E. Henderson and Christopher Brown, Glossary of Literary Theory).

 

b.      Determinism—position that human life is determined by environmental forces, not by human free will

 

c.       Humans as SUBJECTS

i.      “A type of literature that attempts to apply scientific principles of objectivity and detachment to its study of human beings” (Campbell).

ii.      A philosophical position—humans are “human beasts” (Emile Zola) and so can be studied in relation to their environments

iii.      Humans should be studied scientifically, impartially, objectively, without any moralizing about their behaviors or basic nature

iv.      Naturalists “studied human beings” as “governed by their instincts and passions as well as the ways in which the characters’ lives were governed by forces of heredity and environment” (Campbell).

 

II.           Realism vs. Naturalism

a.       “Put rather too simplistically, one rough distinction made by critics is that realism espousing a deterministic philosophy and focusing on the lower classes is considered naturalism” (Donna Campbell, “Naturalism in American Literature”).

 

b.    Some scholars believe naturalism is simply a pessimistic extension of realism, while others argue it is an independent genre altogether (see Pizer, Realism and Naturalism in Nineteenth-Century American Literature).

 

c.     “Although many critics see the naturalistic movement which began in the 1890s as an outgrowth and extension of realism, others consider it, at least in part, a reaction against realism and, therefore, the start of a decline of realism as a movement” (Soo Yeon Choi).

 

d.    Realists (Howells, James, et al.) depict meaningful human choice and free will—but naturalists draw “a stark fictional landscape where force rules and the autonomous will is just a nice idea we fall back on.”

 

e.       Lars Ahnebrink: In contrast to a realist, a naturalist believes that a character is fundamentally an animal, without free will.  “Realism is a manner and method of composition by which the author describes normal, average life, in an accurate, truthful way,” while “Naturalism is a manner and method of composition by which the author portrays ‘life as it is’ in accordance with the philosophic theory of determinism.” 

 

f.        “Naturalism shares with Romanticism a belief that the actual is important not in itself but in what it can reveal about the nature of a larger reality; it differs sharply from Romanticism, however, in finding that reality not in transcendent ideas or absolute ideals but in . . . scientific laws . . . . This distinction may be illustrated in this way.  Given a block of wood and a force pushing upon it, producing in it a certain acceleration: Realism will tend to concentrate its attention on the accurate description of that particular block, that special force, and that definite acceleration; Romanticism will tend to see in the entire operation an illustration or symbol or suggestion of a philosophical truth and will so represent the block, the force, and the acceleration . . . that the idea or ideal that it bodies forth is the center of the interest; and Naturalism will tend to see in the operation a clue or a key to the scientific law which undergirds it and to be interested in the relationships among the force, the block, and the produced acceleration . . .” (C. Hugh Holman, A Handbook to Literature, 4th edition).

 

ROMANTICISM

Often Subjective
Free Will
Optimistic—Emotional Intensity
Tends to Exotic Settings
Extraordinary Events
Unusual Protagonists

REALISM

Objective
Free Will
Often Optimistic
Settings in the Everyday     World
Ordinary Events
Everyday Characters

NATURALISM

Objective
Deterministic
Pessimistic—Emotional Coldness
Settings in the Everyday World
Ordinary Events
Everyday Characters

 

Genre American Authors Perceived the individual as…
Romantics Ralph Waldo Emerson
Nathaniel Hawthorne
a god; idealistic figure
Realists Henry James
William Dean Howells
Mark Twain
person with depth, ability to make ethical choices & act on environment
Naturalists Stephen Crane
Frank Norris
a helpless object who is nevertheless heroic

III.         Characteristics

a.     Characters

i.    Often poorly educated, lower class

ii.    Controlled by forces of heredity, animalistic instinct, raw passion

iii.    No free will or choice—DETERMINISM

iv.    Characters cannot control “the brute within”

 

v.    “The naturalist populates his novel primarily from the lower middle class or the lower class. . . . His fictional world is that of the commonplace and unheroic in which life would seem to be chiefly the dull round of daily existence, as we ourselves usually conceive of our lives.  But the naturalist discovers in this world those qualities of man usually associated with the heroic or adventurous, such as acts of violence and passion which invoke sexual adventure or bodily strength and which culminate in desperate moments and violent death” (Donald Pizer, Realism and Naturalism in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction, 10).

 

vi.    But goal not to utterly dehumanize characters: “The naturalist often describes his characters as though they are conditioned and controlled by environment, heredity, instinct, or chance.  But he also suggests a compensating humanistic value in his characters or their fates which affirms the significance of the individual and of his life.  The tension here is that between the naturalist’s desire to represent in fiction the new, discomfiting truths which he has found in the ideas and life of his late nineteenth-century world, and also his desire to find some meaning in experience which reasserts the validity of the human experience” (Pizer 11).

 

b.    Key themes

i.    Survival (often survival in brutal nature), determinism, violence, social taboo—man against nature, man against himself

ii.    Social determinism, as well—“Survival of the fittest”

 

c.     Plots

i.    Often follow a “plot of decline”

ii.    Plot that depicts progression toward degeneration or death

 

d.    Typical settings: slums, sweatshops, factories, farms

 

e.     Nature

i.    Nature pictured as indifferent force acting on the lives of humans. 

ii.    Again, determinism

iii.    Describe the futile attempts of human beings to exercise free will, often ironically presented, in this universe that reveals free will as an illusion.”

iv.    Stephen Crane, 1894: “A man said to the universe: / ‘Sire, I exist!’ / ‘However,’ replied the universe, / ‘The fact has not created in me / A sense of obligation.”

 

IV.         Frank Norris and Naturalism

 

a.     Realism

i.    Realism is the “drama of a broken teacup, the tragedy of a walk down the block, the excitement of an afternoon call, the adventure of an invitation to dinner” (“A Plea for Romantic Fiction”).

ii.    Realism is the literature of normality and representative: “the smaller details of everyday life, things that are likely to happen between lunch and supper.”

 

b.    Romanticism

i.    Romanticism, on the other hand, deals with “variations from . . . normal life”—it aims to dig below the surface of common experience and reach the ideal, a vision of the very nature of life. 

ii.    Explores “the unplumbed depths of the human heart, and the mystery of sex, and the problems of life, and the unsearched penetralia of the soul of man.”

 

c.     Naturalism

i.    Draws upon the best aspects of both Realism and Romanticism—it uses both detailed accuracy and philosophical depth.

ii.    In a naturalistic novel, “This is not romanticism—this drama of the people working itself out in blood and ordure.  It is not realism.  It is a school by itself, unique, somber, powerful beyond words.”  This new “school” is Naturalism.

 

http://faculty.tamu-commerce.edu.

O naturalismo – período

O naturalismo termo descreve um tipo de literatura que procura aplicar princípios científicos de objetividade e distanciamento de seu estudo dos seres humanos. Ao contrário do realismo, que se concentra na técnica literária, o naturalismo implica uma posição filosófica: para os escritores naturalistas, uma vez que os seres humanos são, na frase de Emile Zola, “bestas humanas”, os personagens podem ser estudados através de suas relações com seu entorno. Descrição Zola 1880 deste método em Le roman experimental (o romance experimental, 1880) segue o modelo médico Claude Bernard e de observação do historiador Hippolyte Taine de que “virtude e o vício são produtos como o vitríolo e o açúcar” – isto é, que os seres humanos como ” produtos “deve ser estudada de forma imparcial, sem moralizar sobre suas naturezas.

Outras influências sobre naturalistas americanos incluem Herbert Spencer e Joseph LeConte. Através deste estudo objetivo dos seres humanos, os escritores naturalistas acreditavam que as leis por trás das forças que governam a vida humana pode ser estudada e compreendida. Escritores naturalistas assim usou uma versão do método científico para escrever seus romances, eles estudaram os seres humanos regidos por seus instintos e paixões, bem como as maneiras pelas quais as vidas dos personagens foram governados por forças da hereditariedade e do ambiente. Apesar de terem utilizado as técnicas de acumular detalhe pioneira pela realistas, naturalistas, assim, um objeto específico em mente quando escolheu o segmento da realidade que eles queriam transmitir. Na frase famosa e muito comentada e contestada George Becker, o marco do naturalismo filosófico pode ser descrita simplesmente como “determinismo materialista pessimista.”

Outra definição concisa como aparece na introdução do Realismo Americano: Novos Ensaios. Nessa peça, “O País do Blue”, Eric comentários Sundquist “, Revelling no extraordinário, o uso excessivo, eo grotesco, a fim de revelar a imutável bestialidade do homem na natureza, o naturalismo dramatiza a perda da individualidade em um nível fisiológico fazendo um calvinismo sem Deus a sua ordem e determinar a sua morte violenta utopia “(13). A definição vez aparece no Realismo Donald Pizer e naturalismo na ficção americana do século XIX, Revised Edition (1984):       T [o] romance naturalista geralmente contém duas tensões ou contradições, e. . . o compreende duas em conjunto, tanto a interpretação de uma experiência e uma recriação estética particular de experiência. Em outras palavras, os dois constituem o tema ea forma do romance naturalista. A primeira é que a tensão entre o assunto do romance naturalista eo conceito de homem que emerge deste assunto. O naturalista preenche sua novela principalmente da classe média baixa ou da classe baixa. . . . Seu mundo ficcional é o do banal e heróico em que a vida parece ser, sobretudo, à monotonia da vida diária, como nós geralmente conceber nossas vidas. Mas o naturalista descobre no mundo das qualidades do homem, geralmente associado com o heróico ou de aventura, tais como atos de violência e paixão que envolve aventura sexual ou força física e que culminam em momentos de desespero e morte violenta. Um romance naturalista é, portanto, uma extensão do realismo apenas no sentido de que ambos os modos de lidar frequentemente com o local e contemporânea. O naturalista, no entanto, descobre neste material extraordinário e excessivo na natureza humana.       A segunda tensão envolve o tema do romance naturalista. O naturalista freqüentemente descreve seus personagens como se eles são condicionados e controlados pelo ambiente, a hereditariedade, o instinto, ou oportunidade. Mas ele também sugere um valor de compensação humanísticos em seus personagens ou de seus destinos, que afirma a importância do indivíduo e de sua vida. A tensão aqui é que entre o desejo do naturalista para representar na ficção o novo, as verdades discomfiting que ele encontrou nas idéias e vida de seu mundo no final do século XIX, e também o seu desejo de encontrar algum sentido na experiência que reafirma a validade da do empreendimento humano. (11/10) Para outras definições, consulte também o Guia de Cambridge para América Realismo eo Naturalismo, Criança Charles Walcutt’s American Literary Naturalismo: A Divided Stream, Forma junho Howard e História na América Literária Naturalismo, Walter Benn Michaels, The Gold Standard e da lógica do Naturalismo, Lee Clark, Determinado Mitchell Fictions, Mark Selzer Corpos e Máquinas, e outras obras da bibliografia naturalismo. Veja Lars Ahnebrink, Richard Lehan e Louis J. Budd para obter informações sobre as origens intelectuais europeus e americanos de naturalismo. Características personagens. caracteres mais frequentes, mas não invariavelmente mal-educado ou de classe baixa, cujas vidas são governadas pelas forças da hereditariedade, instinto e paixão. Suas tentativas de exercer o livre arbítrio ou escolha são prejudicadas por forças além de seu controle, o darwinismo social e outras teorias ajudam a explicar os seus destinos para o leitor. Formulário Ver junho Howard e história para obter informações sobre o espectador do naturalismo. Definição. Freqüentemente configuração urbana, como em McTeague Norris. Ficções Determinado Veja Mitchell Lee Clark, fatos Philip Fisher, e James R. Giles ‘s A Novel Inner City-naturalista na América. Técnicas e parcelas. Walcutt diz que o romance naturalista oferece “clínica, panorâmica, uma fatia de vida” drama que muitas vezes é uma crónica “de desespero” (21). A novela da degeneração – L’Zola Assommoir e Vandover Norris eo Brute, por exemplo – também é um tipo comum. Temas Walcutt identifica a sobrevivência, o determinismo, da violência e tabus como temas-chave. 2. O bruto “dentro” de cada indivíduo, composto por fortes emoções e, muitas vezes em conflito: as paixões, como a luxúria, a avareza, ou o desejo de dominação ou de lazer, bem como a luta pela sobrevivência em um universo amoral indiferente. O conflito no romance naturalista é muitas vezes “o homem contra a natureza” ou “homem contra si mesmo” como personagens lutam para manter um verniz de civilização “, apesar de pressões externas que ameaçam o lançamento bruta” interior “. 3. Natureza como uma força agindo indiferente na vida dos seres humanos. A visão romântica de Wordsworth – que “a natureza nunca traiu o coração que a amava” – aqui se torna ver Stephen Crane em “O Barco” Abrir: “Esta torre era um gigante, de pé com as costas para a situação das formigas . Representava em um grau, para o correspondente, a natureza a serenidade da natureza em meio às lutas do indivíduo – no vento, e da natureza na visão dos homens. Ela não parece cruel para ele, então, nem benéfica, nem traiçoeiro , nem sábio. Mas ela era indiferente, terminantemente indiferente. ” 4. As forças da hereditariedade e do ambiente, como eles afetam – e afligem – vidas individuais. 5. Um universo, indiferente determinista. Naturalista textos descrevem frequentemente as tentativas fúteis de seres humanos para exercer o livre arbítrio, muitas vezes, ironicamente apresentado, neste universo que revela a vontade como uma ilusão.

http://www.ebah.com.br/content/ABAAAA8XIAD/periodizacao-literatura-americana

Colaboradora: Raíra Alves

O Naturalismo na literatura norte-america

Por Laís Azevedo

O termo Naturalismo descreve um tipo de literatura que tenta aplicar princípios e métodos científicos de objetividade ao estudo dos seres humanos. Diferentemente do Realismo, cujo foco está pautado pela técnica literária, o Naturalismo implica numa posição filosófica: para os escritores naturalistas, levando em consideração que os seres humanos são, como diria Émile Zola, “bestas” humanas, as personagens podem ser estudadas através do relacionamento com o que as cerca, isto é, o meio tem papel fundamental. Zola em O Romance experimental segue o modelo médico de Claude Bernard e a observação aduzida nos estudos históricos de Taine, que consistia em dizer que a virtude e o vício são produtos tais como o açúcar e o ácido. Partido desse pensamento, o homem, na concepção naturalista, devia ser estudado de modo imparcial, sem tentar moralizar sua natureza. Nos Estados Unidos, os escritores naturalistas sofreram  também a influência de Hebert Spencer e Joseph LeConte.

Por meio do estudo objetivo dos seres humanos, os autores pertencentes à escola zolista acreditavam que as leis que estavam por detrás do universo poderiam ser estudadas e entendidas. Desse modo, eles lançavam mão do método científico para escreverem seus romances. Isso fazia com que enxergassem os homens como seres governados pelos instintos e paixões; vale destacar que as questões concernentes à hereditariedade e o meio tinham uma força relevante nessas pesquisas. Embora usassem técnicas detalhistas usadas pelos realistas, os naturalistas possuíam um objeto específico em mente quando eles escolhiam qual segmento da realidade desejavam abordar.

George Becker expressa, numa famosa frase, que o pensamento naturalista oitocentista pode ser descrito como “pessimista, materialista e determinista”.  Outra definição interessante pode ser encontrada na obra American Realism: New Essays, nessa o autor Eric Sundquist explicita que “Festejando o extraordinário, o excessivo e o grotesco para revelar a imutável condição de bestialidade do homem na natureza, o Naturalismo dramatiza a perda de individualidade. Poder-se-ia dizer que os escritores naturalistas traziam à tona um Calvinismo sem Deus, isto é, um mundo pautado pelo determinismo das leis naturais”.

Donald Pizers em Realismo e Naturalismo na ficcção americana do século XIX, aponta que:

“O romance naturalista geralmente contem duas tensões (contradições) e… as duas em conjução compreendem uma interpretação da experiência e uma recriação estética da experiência. Em outras palavras, ambas constituem o tema e a forma do supradito romance.A primeira tensão e aquele encontrada entre o assunto da obra naturalista e o conceito de homem que emerge desse. O escritor naturalista coloca em seus livros personagens oriundas da classe média baixa e das classes miseráveis… Seu mundo ficcional é aquele onde o lugar comum e o não-heróico são os componentes principais. Faz-se importante ressaltar que as obras zolistas descobrem em seu mundo características dos homens, que são normalmente associadas com heroísmo e aventura, tais atos, nos escritos naturalistam, descambam na violência e na paixão que envolvem aventuras sexuais ou força do corpo, que culminam em momentos desesperados e numa morte violenta. O romance naturalista, dessa maneira, é uma extensão do realismo , uma vez que os dois partem de “realidades” calcados no local e no contemporâneo. Entretanto, o naturalismo  descobre, graças à sua maneira de abordar o “real”, o elemento excessivo dos seres humanos.

A segunda tensão, por seu turno, envolve o tema dos romances naturalistas. Os escritores naturalistas frequentemente descrevem suas personagens controladas pelo ambiente, pela hereditariedade, instinto e chance. Eles também sugerem um valor humanístico compensador em suas personagens ou destinos que afirmam o significado de suas vidas. A tensão, nesse caso, eclode entre o desejo naturalista de representar na ficção o novo, embaraçando as verdades que ele encontrou nas ideias e na vida do final do século XIX, e também esta surge do desejo de achar um significado na experiência que reafirma a validade do papel do homem no mundo”.

CARACTERÍSTICAS:

Personagens: Frequentemente, mas não invariavelmente, possuem baixa escolaridade, fazem parte das classes baixas, são governadas pelas forças da hereditariedade, do instinto e da paixão. Suas tentativas de exercer o livre arbítrio são barradas pelas forças que os controlam. O darwinismo social e outras teorias ajudam a explicar o destino das personagens para o leitor.

Espaço: Geralmente, os escritores naturalistas usam o espaço urbano como pano de fundo para suas narrativas.

Técnicas e enredo: Walcutt diz que o romance naturalista oferece uma “fatia clínica e panorâmica da vida”, que traz à tona a crônica do desespero.

TEMAS:

Walcutt identifica os temas relacionados à sobrivivência e ao determinismo como os principais.

O estado do brutalismo composto por emoções extremas, como: paixões, luxurias, ambições, o desejo de dominar e a busca pelo prazer; a luta pela sobrevivência num universo amoral e indiferente.

A natureza é uma força que não dá a mínima para a vida dos seres humanos. A visão romântica de que a natureza nunca trai aqueles que a amam, no naturalismo , cai por terra.

As forças da hereditariedade e do espaço afetam a vida das personagens.

Um universo diferente e determinista. As obras naturalistas geralmente descrevem as tentativas inúteis dos seres humanos de exercerem o livre arbítrio, esse não passa de uma ilusão.

http://www.literaturaemfoco.com/?p=1640

Colaboradora: Amanda Agapyto

Artigo sobre o Naturalismo

Apresentação de grupo

Este blog será apresentado como parte do requisito para a aprovação da disciplina de Literatura Norte-americana do curso de letras, licenciaturas da Faculdade Evangélica de Brasília.

Para a elaboração deste trabalho contaremos com o auxílio da professora Diana Benevides e dos membros desse grupo, sendo eles:

  • Amanda Christiana Agapyto
  • Daiane Soares
  • Daniela Soares
  • Divonete Barbosa
  • Francisco Jeovane
  • Luana Paes
  • Nazaré Silva
  • Raíra Alves
  • Ruth Paz

No blog, proucuraremos postar todos os tipos de informações acerca do Naturalismo norte-americano.

Portanto, fiquem de olho para não perder nenhuma informação!!!